At Boca Museum of Art, heroes and the West

Painter Edward Hopper believed that for art to be honest, its creator had to bring to it a sense of “wonder and humility.” Three exhibitions opening Tuesday, Oct. 8, at the Boca Museum of Art celebrate America’s natural majesty and diversity, with a little humility thrown in, as well.

“Southwestern Allure: The Art of the Santa Fe Art Colony”: More than 15 years before he painted the iconic wee-hours New York diner scene in “Nighthawks,” Edward Hopper went to Santa Fe, N.M., to capture the pristine daylight that helped the city develop into a leading art center. Hopper’s “Ranch House, Santa Fe” (1925) is among this exhibition’s more than 40 works created during the colony’s formative years, roughly 1915 to 1940. Others inspired by the ochre mesas and sun-bleached pueblo villages of Santa Fe include Robert Henri, Leon Kroll, John Sloan, Stuart Davis, Andrew Dasburg and Marsden Hartley.

“Nancy Davidson: Let'er Buck”: Another New York artist inspired by the West, Davidson uses rodeo and carnival iconography to tweak the superciliousness of contemporary “super-size” culture. A gathering of photographs, videos and sound, a centerpiece of the show is “Dustup,” a giant inflatable cowgirl sculpture.

“Dulce Pinzón: The Real Story of the Superheroes”: Photographer Pinzón believes that heroism goes on all around us, in lives that mostly go unexamined. The 20 subjects in this show are immigrants in New York who send parts of their modest paychecks to family in Mexico, a heroic act of sacrifice, she believes. The workers, photographed in superhero costumes going about their workday, are identified by their hometown and the amount of money they send back to their family each week.

IF YOU GO
The Boca Museum of Art is at 501 Plaza Real. Admission is $8, $6 seniors, $5 students, 12 and younger free. Call 561-392-2500 or go to BocaMuseum.org.

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