The Biggest Loser - Season 14

In "Face Your Fears" Episode 1409 Joe Ostaszewski stood tall. (NBC / Trae Patton/NBC / December 12, 2012)

Joe Ostaszewski learned Monday night that he finished fourth in NBC’s show “The Biggest Loser,” and some might wonder if he’s disappointed.

He isn’t. Who could be after losing 147 pounds?

Ostaszewski (photographed here when he was still losing the weight) dropped from 364 to 217, 40 percent of his body weight. Danni Allen of Wheeling, Ill, won, losing from 258 to 137 (47 percent).

Ostaszewski, from Boynton Beach, played lineman for Santaluces High School (1985-87) and Florida State University (1987-91), next to his twin brother, Henry. The 43-year-olds both auditioned for “The Biggest Loser,” but the producers only wanted Joe. So Henry started his own weight-loss regiment at home, losing about 125 pounds. Together, they are starting the Wear Your Soul foundation (WearYourSoul.org), which aims to encourage physical fitness among children and young adults through outdoor activities.


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Joe spoke after Monday night’s results.

What did you learn?

That this is sustainable. I changed the way I saw food. I used to see it as pleasure, but now it’s a source of energy. I still enjoy food, but maybe just a slice of pizza and not a whole pie.

How well did you hang in there during the show?

A lot of those people cried on camera; I just waited until I got back to my room without the cameras on

What do you saw to people who start a program and bail out when it gets too hard?

You just have to go back. For me, I kept saying tomorrow, tomorrow, then tomorrow goes and the next day goes.

What about activities?

The key is for everyone to know when you start, find something you like to do. If you don’t like to run, don’t run, how discouraging is that? Even if it’s golf or tennis, go and do something you love to get moving. That’s what turns people off. I don’t like running on a treadmill, I feel like a gerbil.

Tell me again about the message of your brother.

You can do what he did. You keep moving and his story reaches out as much as mine. When he was at his son’s basketball game, he’d be doing jumping jacks, push-ups and working out. I did this on the ranch; my brother did this at home.

What are you going to do next?

I hope to just work on the foundation full-time, and work with Henry speaking about the change.

Any thought of adding some athletic activity?

I’ve always wanted to learn how to kayak but I never could fit in one. Now I can.

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