Hollywood mom Lacey Wildd will star in the upcoming film "Blonde Squad."

Hollywood mom Lacey Wildd keeps getting bigger.

Since appearing on MTV's "True Life" in 2011 and ABC's "20/20" last year for having triple-L size breasts that turn heads wherever she goes, the mother of six has been busier than ever.

Both programs revisited her for updates this year and she's appeared on the Lifetime network show "Double Divas," looking for a customized bra. Wildd also reported to court for "Caso Cerrado," a judge show on Spanish-language network Telemundo, where she explained (with help from a translator) how a big chest changed her life.

As she awaits the January release of her first film, "Blonde Squad,'' in which she plays a heat-packing assassin, Wildd is writing her memoir and producing a documentary about her journey, which began when she was a 21-year-old waitress with an A cup bra size.


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On top of all this, she is preparing for her next surgery — to boost her bra size to triple-Q.

Through donations on her website and social media accounts (she has 25,000 followers on Twitter alone), Wildd has raised $23,000 for the operation set for early 2014. After the procedure, they would weigh a total of 42 pounds.

"I'm nervous about it,'' says Wildd, 45, who wouldn't disclose the name of her surgeon.

She says she knows it's not safe and even told ABC viewers that she's a "walking time bomb." So why do it?

"I want to leave a legacy to my children,'' says Wildd, who has six children ranging in age from 6 to 29, plus a 25-year-old stepson. "My goal was never to be famous. My goal was to be able to take care of them, to be able to support them."

With the additional TV appearances, film work and subscriptions to her website, laceywildd.net, she says she has "quadrupled'' her income from 2012. She wants to retire in three years, at age 48.

"My major goal is to actually retire the boobs. I never really wanted to be known for my boobs, I guess my boobs made me famous,'' says Wildd, sitting in her Hollywood rental home on a recent weekday morning. As she taps her white-tipped fingernails against a glass table, a sticker on her laptop read: "I Love Boobies"

"There is so much more to me than that. I want everybody to see me for me and not just what I look like,'' she says.

There has been some fallout from the fame. Some of Wildd's kids have been cyber-bullied. She makes it a point to deal with her children's teachers over the phone, as to not cause a stir at their schools.

Her daughter Tori Glynn, 18, who appeared with her mom on MTV's "True Life" episodes, says she and her siblings don't care for the spotlight to be cast on them.

"She is kind of like too much, and she's not taking into consideration that this is your project, this is your thing and not all of ours,'' said Glynn, a Broward College student. "Before she got this whole Lacey Wildd persona, she wasn't as confident as she is. Now she goes out and now she does things. I am happy that she's not depressed."

When Wildd does go out, people can't help but gawk. In store dressing rooms, folks snap photos of her with their smartphones. She's been tailed home from Publix. To preserve her privacy, she has shrouded the exterior of her home with palm trees and bushes. She also has a bodyguard for public appearances.

Despite the challenges and the zaniness that comes with living and looming large, Wildd hopes other people will be inspired to pursue their goals, big and small.

"Everyone needs to live their dream and go for it and not worry about being judged,'' she says. "I know a lot of people worry that I am hurting myself or my kids. I promise you, I am not. There was a me before these breasts and I am still that same person."

johnnydiaz@tribune.com or 954-356-4939