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"Hidden Figures," "Stranger Things" and "Orange Is the New Black" took home the top ensemble prizes at the 23rd Screen Actors Guild Awards. While the event was a celebration of actors and their craft, the current political climate was not far from the minds of many stars on the red carpet and on the stage. Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Mahershala Ali, Bryan Cranston, David Harbour and others used their time at the podium to address recent events and the policies of President Donald Trump.

SAG Awards

Backstage and unguarded with the 'Hidden Figures' cast after winning their SAG Awards

"Hidden Figures" writer-director Theodore Melfi and actors Octavia Spencer, Taraji P. Henson and Janelle Monáe celebrate after winning for outstanding performance by a cast in a motion picture. (Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)
"Hidden Figures" writer-director Theodore Melfi and actors Octavia Spencer, Taraji P. Henson and Janelle Monáe celebrate after winning for outstanding performance by a cast in a motion picture. (Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)

"Hold it, baby!" Taraji P. Henson urged Janelle Monáe, passing her their cast's just-won Screen Actors Guild Award as if to prove it was real.

It seemed that no one in the cast of "Hidden Figures" expected to win the biggest film prize of the night on Sunday. Leading up to the telecast, nearly all of the award season pundits had the best film ensemble race between "Moonlight" and "Manchester By the Sea." So as the "Hidden Figures" cast bounded from the stage, their disbelief was palpable. Octavia Spencer, dabbing her eyes with a tissue, kept screaming suddenly as she made her way toward a room filled with photographers. Every few moments, she would stare down in awe at the envelope Nicole Kidman had delivered to the cast, announcing their win.

"I'm not letting this out of my sight," she said aloud.

As the cast circulated through the tiny hallways of the Shrine Auditorium, the group swelled when Glen Powell -- who plays late astronaut John Glenn in the film -- invited his family to tag along with the melee. His mother introduced herself to Henson, who took a moment to tell her what a polite son she'd raised. "I'm a mom," Henson said, "so I know it's all because of you."

Anticipating the impending onslaught of selfie-seekers, Henson and Spencer stopped at a L'Oreal touchup station, dabbing off their sweat.

"We are going to take pictures, so pat down, ladies! Pat down!" Spencer advised.

Before they could pose for photos, however, the cast had to pick up their individual trophies. (They'd only been given one onstage by Kidman.) The bronze statues -- which are 16 inches tall and weigh 12 pounds -- were all accounted for, save for Kevin Costner's. The actor wasn't in attendance, so his award remained on a table with an unsigned contract meant to acknowledge receipt of the prize.

With the bronze men finally in hand -- "This is heavy!" Henson noted -- the group made its way to the press room to field questions. Saniyya Sidney, the 10-year-old actress who plays one of Henson's daughters in the film, trailed behind, crying quiet tears of joy.

"Is she still crying?" her mother asked.

"She is an actress, guys," her father said with a smile.

Sidney pulled herself together before standing on the podium in front of reporters, where the cast fielded questions about the relevance of "Hidden Figures" -- which Henson noted just hit $100 million at the box office.

"The movie reminds us that we've been through harder times," suggested Monáe. "And as Kevin Costner says in the film, we all pee the same color. We're not that damn different."

"Well, unless you eat a lot of beets," noted Spencer.

A publicist signaled it was time for the group to make its way to another stop, and Henson sighed.

"Can we go to the bar now?" she asked Kirsten Dunst, who replied, "I think we can go get a drink!"

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