Movies

Tony Awards: 'Death of a Salesman' wins for revival of a play

The recent production of Arthur Miller's "Death of a Salesman," starring Philip Seymour Hoffman and Andrew Garfield, won the Tony Award for revival of a play. Scott Rudin, one of the producer's of the revival, accepted the award and was joined on stage by the play's cast. 

"Death of a Salesman" was one of the top-selling productions of the recent Broadway season. The show, directed by Mike Nichols, commanded top ticket prices and regularly played to full houses at the Ethel Barrymore Theatre.

The revival opened in March and closed on June 2.

TONYS 2012: Red carpet | Winners & Nominees

The other nominees in the play revival category were Gore Vidal's "The Best Man," Margaret Edson's "Wit" and Terrence McNally's "Master Class."

Last year's winner in the category was Larry Kramer's "The Normal Heart."

"Death of a Salesman" first opened on Broadway in 1949, winning the Tony for best play and the Pulitzer Prize for drama.

RELATED:

'Salesman' scares Mike Nichols

Theater review: 'Death of a Salesman' on Broadway

Tony Awards 2012: 'Once,' 'Porgy and Bess' among top nominees

 

Copyright © 2015, South Florida
Related Content
  • Tony Awards 2012: The complete nominees and winners list

    Tony Awards 2012: The complete nominees and winners list

    Here is the full list of Tony nominations for 2012 (WINNERS are noted):

  • Happy birthday to Hitchcock composer Bernard Herrmann

    Bernard Herrmann, who gave "Citizen Kane" (1941) its eerie, jolly sonic admixture, "Psycho" (1960) its nervous system and "Taxi Driver" (1976) its lonely, perversely romantic noir ache, was born this day in 1911 in New York City.  There are too many selections to highlight. We’ll settle for five.

  • 'Magic Mike XXL' review: The complete package

    'Magic Mike XXL' review: The complete package

    "Magic Mike XXL" comes up a little short compared with the original, director Steven Soderbergh's blithe and bonny Channing Tatum showcase inspired by Tatum's salad days as a male stripper. This time the jokes are heavier, more on-the-nose, though a surprising percentage of them work anyway.

  • 'Ted 2' review: More of the same bawdy bear

    'Ted 2' review: More of the same bawdy bear

    "Ted 2" reunites Mark Wahlberg’s insecure wallflower character (it's called acting, folks) with the chubby little cubby all stuffed with fluff and racial, sexual, scatological and '80s-reference insults voiced, with movie-saving acumen, by co-writer and director Seth MacFarlane.

  • 'The Overnight' review: Wedded bliss put to the test

    'The Overnight' review: Wedded bliss put to the test

    Alex has an inferiority complex. His appendage is on the smaller end of the spectrum, and at a key, comically awkward moment in "The Overnight," this newcomer to LA played by Adam Scott sizes up what his new friend Kurt (Jason Schwartzman) has to offer. In a couple of key, highly amusing shots...

  • 'Infinitely Polar Bear' review: Struggles of a bipolar father

    'Infinitely Polar Bear' review: Struggles of a bipolar father

    How much funny goes with the crazy? Facile as it sounds, this is the question guiding the efforts of a considerable number of writer-directors over the years, as they have brought family stories (often autobiographical) involving some form of mental illness to the screen.

Comments
Loading