Keller Williams

Keller Williams (center, ducking), pictured with the Travelin' McCourys, will perform a solo show Saturday, Nov. 17, at Fort Lauderdale's Revolution Live. (C Flanigan/Courtesy / November 17, 2012)

If singer-songwriter Keller Williams lingers too long in any specific music genre, the casually versatile performer admits he'll probably lose interest.

"I haven't been officially diagnosed with ADD, but I suspect it, and I mean that in the nicest possible way," says Williams, 42, who for the Florida leg of his tour will perform solo Saturday night at Revolution Live. "It all starts with a song getting stuck in your head, and then it goes to playing bass and reggae in a band one day and go nuts jamming solo the next. It's where I'm happiest and most restless."

Williams' 18th and most-recent monosyllabic album, "Pick," was released in July and pairs the charismatic Richmond, Va., one-man-jam-band with the twangy strings of Nashville bluegrass legend Del McCoury and his Travelin' McCourys. Williams says their collaboration, begun last year at a bluegrass festival in Fredericksburg, Va., led to recording the bulk of "Pick" over three days, an album split with Williams originals and his typically bizarre motley of covers, which span Mike Doughty to My Morning Jacket and, yes, even to British pop-artist Jessie J.

Williams, a father of two who counts the late Jaco Pastorius among his all-time favorite bassists, has been indecisive since childhood, reared on his parents' diet of Waylon Jennings and Willie Nelson, his sister's AC/DC and Supertramp, and a teenage phase of Kiss' "Destroyer," Sex Pistols, the Circle Jerks and R.E.M. But Jerry Garcia and Michael Hedges' new-age funk got him into jam-banding and, most recently, to record albums of bluegrass covers (2010's "Thief"), family-friendly music ("Kids," with his daughter, Elle, and son, Cabell) and reggae dub-funk (2011's "Bass").


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"Pick" likewise dips into a wide pool of genres, with tracks crafted with Williams' upbeat acoustic axe-playing and backed by live-stage looping of vocals and instrumentals. His standouts: "Mullet Cut," a goofy song about the namesake hairstyle, and a cover of Jessie J's Top 40 hit "Price Tag," in Williams' dexterous hands a blistering, stripped-down anthem punched with bluegrass and backed by vocals from fiddler Jason Carter, bassist Alan Bartram, banjo man Rob McCoury and mandolinist Ronnie McCoury.

"I become so used to playing solo that I start missing human interaction. Performing solo is my day job, but collaborating is my playtime," Williams says. "I'm very self-indulgent when it comes to my career. It's a relentless pursuit to entertain myself, and the fact I get away with it is shocking."

Keller Williams will perform 8 p.m. Nov. 17 at Revolution Live, 100 SW Third Ave., in Fort Lauderdale. $19. 954-449-1025 or JoinTheRevolution.net.