Lynda Carter: What would Wonder Woman do with Donald Trump?

Lynda Carter has been singing since she was 14.

That was before winning Miss World-USA and before becoming a star as Wonder Woman on television in the 1970s.

And she’s still doing it. Carter, who plays the president of the United States on the CW’s “Supergirl” and will appear in the upcoming movie “Super Troopers 2,” is bringing her concert “The Other Side of Trouble” to Seminole Casino Coconut Creek on Saturday, Sept. 23.

Carter recently dished about that show, the possibility of sharing the screen with Gal Gadot in the “Wonder Woman” sequel, and what she’d like to do to Donald Trump, in a telephone interview, with many questions coming from her fans on Facebook.

So tell me about this show you’re bringing to South Florida. I hear the musicians are pretty special.

I think I’ve been with the same group of guys for 10 years. They are studio musicians out of Nashville. We have a 10-piece [band] onstage and myself, and we really have chosen a show that, well, it’s got everything from original music that we’ve written … to ZZ Ward, Eric Clapton, to blues singer Bobby “Blue” Bland, to old-time rock ’n’ roll. It’s just a wide range of music. We just have a good time, and I can’t wait to bring it to South Florida.

Also, my daughter is going to be singing a couple of duets with me at the Seminole Casino Coconut Creek. We spent a few weeks in Europe, and now she’s going to be finished with the bar [exam] and will be working in Washington, but she’s also a great singer. So that’s going to be cool. She’s quite beautiful.

You’re working with these guys on your album, right? You’re spending a lot of time in Nashville working on your third studio album, I hear.

Yes. I’m just finishing it up. I hope to have it out soon. I’ve got to finish pulling it all together, putting the songs in the order you want.

And you’re still in the superhero game with “Supergirl.” What’s that like?

I’ve enjoyed it very much. It’s written well, the writers are very good. I mean, I’m playing a president who turns into an alien. It was really a surprise. This part of my life has been very interesting. Normally, a lot of people scramble for work at a certain time in their careers and life, and I don’t seem to be doing that.

You’ve got a lot coming up in April, don’t you? You’re in “Super Troopers 2,” and that comes out then, right?

“Super Troopers” comes out on the 20th of April, I think, and I just can’t wait. It’s going to be fantastic. I’ve heard a lot of buzz, and the buzz is excellent. I love those guys [the Broken Lizard comedy troupe].

And you’re getting a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame around then, too, correct?

There’s a lot ahead of that … April 3, I think it’s going to be.

I was just wondering if this was all timed for maybe a cameo in the “Wonder Woman” sequel.

No, it’s just kind of happening. And it’s thrilling. It’s really great. It’s not planned out that way. When you say it like that, it’s like we planned it.

So let me come right out and ask you: Are you going to be in ‘Wonder Woman 2’?

Well, I don’t know yet. It’s up to Patty [Jenkins, the director]. I adore Patty and Gal [Gadot, the star of “Wonder Woman”], and it’s going to be up to them to find something for me to do.

I was looking at your social-media accounts, and you are not afraid to go in when it comes to politics, are you?

There is a dismantling of all these safeguards that took years and years to put into place. All these Southern states that were voting against … the EPA and science. And they were saying that the federal government is too big. That is, until you need it. Then, there’s a storm or some disaster, and it’s, “Where’s FEMA? Where’s our water? Where’s this, and where’s that?” You can’t have it both ways. There’s a reason why we have these things in place.

I don’t blame the voters. I blame the legislators. But the voters have got to be informed. They have to know what things are being done that are not in their best interest, that are against them. I feel so bad about the floods and climate change. And then, there was this Southern senator that was saying these are not emergencies. That we should not spend money, that people should spend their own money and not the government’s money. That these things are natural disasters. They are not emergencies. I was like, “What?” It’s just shocking. Disasters and emergencies don’t go hand in hand?

You’re Hispanic on your mother’s side. So some of your fans on Facebook want to know what you think about the proposed repeal of DACA?

Even if you see the illegal immigrants as criminals, as many do, you cannot put that criminal action on top of children. They did not do anything criminal. They did not have choices. They came over with their families. It’s not like they say anyone can come over. These are people who haven’t committed any crimes. They are going through the process of going to school and registering and there are promises that our government made to them and now those promises are broken. And now, it’s bye-bye, go to a country that’s completely foreign to them.

And I’ve come to understand on my [Facebook and Twitter] pages that people are just misinformed about what DACA is. They are just misinformed, especially if they are getting their news from Breitbart or Fox News. They are likely misinformed by that. I mean “fake news” was not invented by CNN or the New York Times. It was created by the alt-right. There is a reason they call it that. I have a great respect for the office of the president, so I try to post things about the issues and not just name calling.

Another Facebook fan wonders how you think Wonder Woman would deal with Trump, Pence, McConnell and Ryan?

That’s easy: with the lasso of truth. That’s all we need. I think they all ought to be under the lasso of truth or a lie-detector test.

There were a lot of questions about feminism, but I thought one of the sweetest was: Do you realize that you are a pioneer in the feminist movement?

I know. It’s so great, being a pioneer. Yes, I do. At the time, you’re really not aware of it. But when you look back, there is an inspiration there that you are part of. It’s really nice.

What were the studio and the network’s thoughts on feminism in the “Wonder Woman” series back in the ’70s?

I think they were terrified of that, of it being too feminist. As a matter of fact, from the early ones they wanted to take the feminist stuff out. They were worried about it being too feminist. I don’t know why, but they were. It’s silly. They didn’t want it to be too feminist-sounding. It’s silly when you think about it.

What do you think about the representation of Hispanics on television?

I think, for me, it’s come a long way. I think there’s a much better representation of diversity. You know, it’s not nearly as interesting when everyone is one color. I was in Warsaw recently, and [Poland] doesn’t have any immigration whatsoever. Ethnic people has been scrubbed from the area over many hundreds of years. And you walk around Warsaw, and everyone is white, and you think, “What’s wrong with this picture?” It’s very strange. I was a little bit uncomfortable. There was no diversity. It just felt strange. Weird.

Who are your superheroes in real life?

Well, of course, my wonderful husband [lawyer Robert A. Altman]. He is my hero. My dad and my son. They are outstanding men. My husband is No. 1. He is my superhero. He is the greatest guy I have ever known, and I’m still in love with him.

A lot of people on Facebook commented on how great you look and wondered how you kept your figure. But I thought it was interesting that one person wanted to know what your binge food was?

Hmm, snacks? I’m more salty savory that sweet. I would say guacamole.

Did you ever get dizzy doing all that spinning as Wonder Woman? I’m not asking that, a Facebook friend is. Although I must admit that I’m curious.

No. I’m a dancer. You spot.

Do you have a Wonder Woman doll collection?

I have a couple of them, but I don’t have a collection.

A friend caught a recent concert of yours just outside of Nashville, and said that the power went out. He actually wrote me a message saying, “It was one of those few times in your life you realize, at the time you are experiencing it, that this is one of the best things you will witness in your lifetime.”

Oh, my. Yes, we had a power outage. We brought the upright bass down and brought a guitar, and we all just sort of sat around and just did it kind of a cappella, a kind of intimate sing. Everyone sat around, and we talked a bit, and then we just finished the show like that. It was great.

It kind of dovetails into your philosophy that, “When you do the right thing, the right things happen.”

And I do believe that. You know the right thing, it’s not always the most convenient thing. It’s not the easiest thing. So it was just, “Let’s figure this out. We’re not going to walk offstage.” So we did it. It was great

Is it fun showing the audience another side of you?

Oh, I’m not trying to prove anything. That’s not what I’m out there to do. I’ve been singing for a long time. I’m not out there trying to convince them of anything. I’m out there to bring them into my world, to an experience. Live music does that. A lot of things can happen, and a lot of things do happen. Like that time in Nashville when we lost power. What do you do? You figure something out. It’s an experience that I have with the audience and that the audience has with us. I must say that we are, the band and I, a fine-tuned machine. We’re on the razor’s edge.

Lynda Carter’s concert “The Other Side of Trouble” will take place 8 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 23, in the Pavilion at Seminole Casino Coconut Creek, 5550 NW 40th St. (corner of State Road 7 and Sample Road). Tickets cost from $40 to $60. To order, call Ticketmaster at 800-653-8000 or go to CasinoCoco.com.

rhagwood@southflorida.com

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